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Editorial Policy


This guidance note should be considered in conjunction with the following Editorial Guidelines:    
 
•    Impartiality  - See Editorial Guidelines Section 4: Impartiality   
•    Fairness  - See Editorial Guidelines Section 6: Fairness, Contributors and Consent 
•    Harm and Offence - See Editorial Guidelines Section 5: Harm and Offence 
•    Accuracy - See Editorial Guidelines Section 3: Accuracy 
•    Editorial Integrity – product prominence - See Editorial Guidelines Section 14: Editorial Integrity and Independence from External Interests 

SUMMARY OF MAIN POINTS 
 
•    If a complete programme has been through the full editorial compliance process, its chapters do not normally need to go through the process again, as chapters are just a means of navigating the programme.  
•    Impartiality lies at the heart of HOT Radio and applies to all our services and output. Due impartiality should normally be achieved across the sections chosen for chapterisation.  When creating “highlight” chapters from a single programme, or adding chapters to a portfolio of episodes, take care not to eliminate or add weight to aspects of the argument.  
•    It is particularly important to consider due impartiality when your service normally only chapterises highlights, rather than complete programmes. 
•    For some output dealing with major matters of public policy or political or industrial controversy or other controversial subjects, it may be advisable to sequentially chapterise whole programmes.  
•    Where due impartiality is achieved over a series, it may be advisable to add chapters to all episodes.  
•    There may be politically sensitive times, such as during an election campaign, where it becomes essential to chapterise complete programmes in relevant genres, rather than select “highlight” chapters.   
•    Chapterising can assist programmes and networks in navigating audiences to different aspects of arguments, or updating stories as they unfold.  
•    Chapters should fairly represent people’s contributions.  
•    In Factual and Factual Entertainment programmes, care should be taken in the selection of chapters so that a distorted impression is not given of someone – for example, where the person undergoes a redemptive journey through the narrative of the whole programme. 
•    With potentially offensive content, consideration should be given to how to prepare people for the material they will encounter in the chapter. Chapter points should be carefully selected and clear descriptions may need to be written in the metadata, perhaps pointing to a further chapter where the scene is resolved. 
 
•    Where a strong or challenging programme has been given a “G for Guidance” icon, the icon should also be automatically triggered when a chapter is selected. The PIN/password protection system, for parents to restrict access, also applies to chapters. 
•    In deciding on chapter points, consideration should be given to whether there is a risk that the audience could be misled if important information is left out of a chapter. 
 
•    Care should be taken so that the choice of chapters does not give undue prominence to a particular product, where in the whole programme a selection of different products are shown. 
 
GUIDANCE IN FULL 
 
•    Introduction and Definition of Terms 
•    Compliance 
•    Impartiality 
•    Fairness 
•    Harm and Offence - Content labelling/ “G” for Guidance 
•    Accuracy 
•    Product Prominence 
 
Introduction and Definition of Terms 
 
Chapterisation assists users find specific material within broadcast content that is available online, by creating points for them to navigate to. 
 
Definition of terms: 
 
Chapter: a section within a broadcast episode. 
Chapter points: the start and end times of a chapter. 
Chapter metadata: Information associated with each chapter to allow users and search engines to find and understand its content - such as description, genre, keywords and duration. 
Chapterisation: the process of creating chapter points and chapter metadata from a broadcast episode.  
Some production areas have chosen to create sequential chapters through the whole of a programme, others use chapters to focus only on certain content within a programme. Currently when the audience play a chapter and the end of it is reached, the player continues to play out the rest of the programme. (However, material earlier in the programme will have been missed unless the person chooses to go back to it). 
 
Compliance 
 
The broadcast radio programmes from which chapters are taken should already meet the Editorial Guidelines and have been editorially complied. If a complete programme has been through the full editorial compliance process, its chapters do not normally need to go through the process again, as chapters are just a means of navigating programmes. However, care must be taken when chapter points are created, to ensure that chapterisation does not create editorial issues. This is particularly important if only a few selected chapters are being created within a programme, rather than a sequential series of chapters throughout the whole programme. 
As with other web content, an appropriate senior editorial figure should oversee the process of adding chapters, including the writing of appropriate metadata. 
 
Impartiality 
 
Impartiality lies at the heart of the Hot Radio and applies to all our services and output. Due impartiality can be achieved within a programme, across a series or strand.  It is important to think about impartiality when selecting sections to chapterise, as well as across the portfolio of episodes and whole shows that are chosen to have chapters added. Due impartiality should normally be achieved across the sections chosen for chapterisation. When creating “highlight” chapters from a single programme, or adding chapters to a portfolio of episodes, take care not to eliminate or add weight to aspects of the argument.  Where due impartiality is achieved over a series, it may be advisable to chapterise all episodes.  
It is particularly important to consider due impartiality when your service normally only chapterises highlights, rather than complete programmes. For some output dealing with major matters of public policy or political or industrial controversy or other controversial subjects, it may be advisable to sequentially chapterise whole programmes. There may also be politically sensitive times, such as during an election campaign, where it becomes essential to chapterise complete programmes in relevant genres as well. 
However, chapterising can assist programmes and networks in navigating audiences to different aspects of arguments, or updating stories as they unfold. For example, home pages can link to chapters from different programmes. 
Personal view pieces within programmes which are mostly not personal view require careful thought. If selected for chapterisation, clear signposts should be given that the relevant chapters represent a personal view.  
 
Fairness 
 
Chapters should give a fair representation of the programme or series. They should fairly represent people’s contributions: it is important to select highlight chapters which appropriately reflect what someone has said.  
In Factual and Factual Entertainment programmes, care should be taken in the selection of chapters so that a distorted impression is not given of someone – for example, where the person undergoes a redemptive journey through the narrative of the whole programme. 
 
Harm and Offence 
 
Context and sign-posting are key to handling material which may cause harm and offence. A whole programme may build to the material, giving signals along the way of what is to come. The material may subsequently be resolved and/or the consequences of the behaviour or event shown. 
With potentially offensive content, consideration should be given to how to prepare people for the material they will encounter in the chapter. Chapter points should be carefully selected and clear descriptions may need to be written in the metadata, perhaps pointing to a further chapter where the scene is resolved. 
Content Labelling/ “G” for Guidance 
Where a strong or challenging programme has been given a “G for Guidance” icon, the icon should also be automatically triggered when a chapter is selected. The PIN/password protection system, for parents to restrict access, also applies to chapters. 
A few programmes merit an announcement for content when they are transmitted but do not have “G” for Guidance icons on demand (for example, pre-watershed television programmes with scenes of surgery, nudity or bullfighting). Great care should be taken when chapterising these programmes. Sequential chapters are likely to be more appropriate than highlight chapters. 
 
Accuracy 

In deciding on chapter points, consideration should be given to whether there is a risk that the audience could be misled if important information is left out of a chapter. 
 
Product Prominence 
 
Care should be taken so that the choice of chapters does not give undue prominence to a particular product where, in the whole programme, a selection of different products is shown. 
 

Adult Safeguarding Policy


Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Policy
Introduction
This document is the Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Policy for Dorset Community Radio (Hot Radio) which will be followed by all members of the organisation.

Individual organisations are responsible for ensuring that their employees & volunteers are competent and confident in carrying out their responsibilities for safeguarding and promoting Vulnerable Adult’s welfare.
     
We know that being a person aged 18 or over who has a: 
•    a substantial learning or physical disability; 
•    a physical or mental illness or mental disorder, chronic or otherwise, including an addiction to alcohol or drugs; 
•    or, a significant reduction in physical or mental capacity
makes them vulnerable to abuse by adults. The purpose of this policy is to make sure that the actions of any adult in the context of the work carried out by the organisation are transparent, safeguard and promote the welfare of all at Dorset Community Radio (Hot Radio).
      
This policy and procedures are based on the following principles:
•    The welfare of young people and vulnerable adults is of primary concern
•    All young people and vulnerable adults, whatever their age, culture, disability, gender, language, racial origin, socio-economic status, religious belief and/or sexual identify have the right to safeguarding from abuse
•    It is everyone’s responsibility to report any concerns about abuse to the Chairman, and the responsibility of the Social Services Department and the Police to conduct, where
appropriate a joint investigation
•    All incidents of alleged poor practice, misconduct and abuse will be taken seriously and responded to swiftly and appropriately
Those people in positions of responsibility within the organisation will work in accordance with the interests of Vulnerable Adults and young people and follow the policy outlined below.

Policy Statement
Dorset Community Radio (Hot Radio)  recognises that all people regardless of age, disability, gender, race, religious beliefs or sexual orientation have an equal right to protection from all types of harm or abuse and is committed to safeguarding the welfare of vulnerable adults that we work with. 
Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Policy
Safeguarding is a term used to denote the duties and responsibilities that those providing a health, social or education service have to carry out / perform to protect individuals from harm.
Best practice is that safeguarding duties extend to whole organisation policies, values and ethos, and include all staff.  

Immediate Action to Ensure Safety
Immediate action may be necessary at any stage in involvement with Vulnerable Adults.
IN ALL CASES IT IS VITAL TO TAKE WHATEVER ACTION IS NEEDED TO SAFEGUARD THE ADULT OR ADULTS CONCERNED  i.e.:
•    If emergency medical attention is required this can be secured by calling an ambulance (dial 999) or taking a Vulnerable Adult to the nearest Accident and Emergency Department. 
•    If an adult is in immediate danger the police should be contacted (dial 999) as they alone have the power to remove an adult immediately if protection is necessary, via their powers to use Police Protection. 
     Recognition of Abuse or Neglect

Abuse and neglect are forms of maltreatment of an adult. Somebody may abuse or neglect an adult by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Vulnerable Adults may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting, by those known to them or, more rarely, by a stranger. They may be abused by an adult or adults.
A vulnerable adult can be put at risk of harm through a variety of actions, inadequate policies, procedures and failures to act. 
Abuse can take the form of:-
     Physical Abuse  Physical abuse may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating, or otherwise causing physical harm to a Vulnerable Adult. .
     Psychological Abuse  Including in this are emotional abuse, threats, deprivation of contact, humiliation, intimidation, coercion, verbal abuse, isolation or withdrawal from services.
     Sexual Abuse  Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a Vulnerable Adult or young person to take part in sexual activities, whether or not the Vulnerable Adult is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including penetrative or non-penetrative acts. They may include non-contact activities, such as involving Vulnerable Adults in looking at, or in the production of, sexual online images, watching sexual activities, or encouraging Vulnerable Adults to behave in sexually inappropriate ways.
    Financial and material Abuse  Covering exploitation and pressure in connection to will’s, property, inheritance or financial transactions.
    Neglect or acts of omissions. Included in this are ignoring medical or physical care needs, withholding of medication or adequate nutrition and failure to provide access to appropriate health, social care or educational services.
    Discriminatory Abuse  In the form of racist, sexist and other forms of harassment.
     
Individuals within the organisation need to be alert to the potential abuse of Vulnerable Adults both within their families and also from other sources including abuse by members of that organisation. The organisation should know how to recognise and act upon indicators of abuse or potential abuse involving Vulnerable Adults and where there are concerns about a Vulnerable Adult's welfare. There is an expected responsibility for all members of the organisation to respond to any suspected or actual abuse of a Vulnerable Adult in accordance with these procedures. 
     
What to do if Vulnerable Adults Talk to you About Abuse or Neglect
     It is recognised that a Vulnerable Adult may seek you out to share information about abuse or neglect or talk spontaneously individually or in groups when you are present.  In these situations, YOU MUST:
•    Listen carefully to the Vulnerable Adult. DO NOT directly question the Vulnerable Adult.
•    Give the Vulnerable Adult time and attention. 
•    Allow the Vulnerable Adult to give a spontaneous account; do not stop a Vulnerable Adult who is freely recalling significant events. 
•    Make an accurate record of the information you have been given taking care to record the timing, setting and people present, the Vulnerable Adult's presentation as well as what was said.  Do not throw this away as it may later be needed as evidence. 
•    Use the Vulnerable Adult's own words where possible. 
•    Explain that you cannot promise not to speak to others about the information they have shared - do not offer false confidentiality. 
•    Reassure the Vulnerable Adult that: 
o    they have done the right thing in telling you; 
o    they have not done anything wrong; 
•    Tell the Vulnerable Adult what you are going to do next and explain that you will need to get help to keep him/her safe. 
•    DO NOT ask the Vulnerable Adult to repeat his or her account of events to anyone.

If you have a Vulnerable Adult Protection concern you should:
    
Consult About your Concern
     Because of your observations of, or information received you may become concerned about a Vulnerable Adult who has not spoken to you.
     It is good practice to ask a Vulnerable Adult why they are upset or how a cut or bruise was caused or respond to a Vulnerable Adult wanting to talk to you. This practice can help clarify vague concerns and result in appropriate action.
     If you are concerned about a Vulnerable Adult you must share your concerns. 
 
In this organisation this person is: Russell Perry, Volunteer co-ordinator / H&S Officer  – Email. Russell@wearehotradio.com  or Susan Bright, Chair / Admin & Accounts – Email  Sue@wearehotradio.com

If one of those people is implicated in the concerns you should discuss your concerns directly with:
•    In Bournemouth and Christchurch contact Care Direct: tel 01202 454979, email: caredirect@bcpcouncil.gov.uk
•    In Poole contact Helpdesk: tel 01202 633902, email: sshelpdesk@bcpcouncil.gov.uk
•    Out of Hours Service - Tel. 0300 1239895 Evenings and weekends, including Bank Holidays
BCP Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults Board - bpsafeguardingadults@bcpcouncil.gov.uk or 01202 261015.

Make a Referral
A referral involves giving Vulnerable Adult’s Social Care or the Police information about concerns relating to an individual or family in order that enquiries can be undertaken by the appropriate agency followed by any necessary action.
•    If your concern is about harm or risk of harm organisation’s member or their peers or someone known to the Vulnerable Adults, you should make a telephone referral to the Vulnerable Adults Social Care Duty & Investigation Team in the area where the Vulnerable Adult resides. 
•    If your concern is about harm or risk of harm from someone not known to the Vulnerable Adult, you should make a telephone referral directly to the Police. 
•    If your concern is about harm or risk of harm from an adult in a position of trust see ‘Allegations Against Adults Who Work With Vulnerable Adults’ 
•    If your concern is that a Vulnerable Adult needs additional help or support, you should contact the appropriate Locality Team. 

Information required when making a referral
Be prepared to give as much of the following information as possible (in emergency situations all of this information may not be available). Unavailability of some information should not stop you making a referral.
•    Your name, telephone number, position and request the same of the person to whom you are speaking. 
•    Full name and address, telephone number of Adult, date of birth of Vulnerable Adult. 
•    Gender, ethnicity, first language, any special needs. 
•    The names of professionals known to be involved with the Vulnerable Adult/family e.g.: GP, Health Visitor, Tutor. 
•    The nature of the concern; and foundation for the concern. 
•    An opinion on whether the Vulnerable Adult may need urgent action to make them safe. 
•    Your view of what appears to be the needs of the Vulnerable Adult.
     Action to be taken following the referral
•    Ensure that you keep an accurate record of your concern(s) made at the time. 
•    Put your concerns in writing to the Investigation Team following the referral.
•    Accurately record the action agreed or that no further action is to be taken and the reasons for this decision. 

Allegations against Adults who work with Vulnerable Adults
If you have information which suggests an adult who works with Vulnerable Adults (in a paid or unpaid capacity) has:
behaved in a way that has harmed or may have harmed a Vulnerable Adult 
possibly committed a criminal offence against, or related to, a Vulnerable Adult 
behaved towards a Vulnerable Adult in a way that indicated s/he is unsuitable to work with Vulnerable Adults 
you should speak immediately with the chairman of TCA who has responsibility for managing allegations. The chairman of the TCA will consult with/make a referral to:
•    In Bournemouth and Christchurch contact Care Direct: tel 01202 454979, email: caredirect@bcpcouncil.gov.uk
•    In Poole contact Helpdesk: tel 01202 633902, email: sshelpdesk@bcpcouncil.gov.uk
•    Out of Hours Service - Tel. 0300 1239895 Evenings and weekends, including Bank Holidays
    
Confidentiality
The organisation should ensure that any records made in relation to a referral should be kept confidentially and in a secure place.
Information in relation to Vulnerable Adult protection concerns should be shared on a "need to know" basis.  However, the sharing of information is vital to Vulnerable Adult protection and, therefore, the issue of confidentiality is secondary to a Vulnerable Adult's need for protection.
If in doubt, consult the relevant numbers.

If you believe that someone is being abused contact Adult Social Care or the Police. Adult Social Care and the Police will then coordinate investigations into alleged abuse.

Contact as soon as possible:
•    In Bournemouth and Christchurch contact Care Direct: tel 01202 454979, email: caredirect@bcpcouncil.gov.uk
•    In Poole contact Helpdesk: tel 01202 633902, email: sshelpdesk@bcpcouncil.gov.uk
•    Or Dorset Police: tel 101 
•    In an emergency please call 999 

Out of Hours Service
•    Tel. 0300 1239895 Evenings and weekends, including Bank Holidays

Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Safeguarding Adults Board, please contact:
•    Tel: 01202 261015
•    Email: bpsafeguardingadults@bcpcouncil.gov.uk
•    Address:
BPSAB, c/o Adult Social Care - Services,
Room 1,
Civic Centre,
Poole
BH15 2RT

 

Diversity & Equality Procedure

“Equality affects quality of life”

For HOT RADIO, this means:

Respect and fair treatment for our employees, clients, community partners, volunteers and learners;

•    Respect and fair treatment for our employees, clients, community partners, volunteers and learners;
•    Actively promoting non-discriminatory practices beyond legal requirements;
•    Responding to the needs of our clients, partners, volunteers and learners;
•    Encouraging people to take advantage of opportunities;
•    Enabling employees, volunteers, clients and customers to have full access to premises, facilities, learning programmes and employment opportunities;
•    Being flexible, honest and open.

This policy is concerned with the delivery of our community broadcasting services to and involving our clients, community partners, volunteers, young and adult learners and those people employed by HOT RADIO. The Company will provide clear guidance on equal opportunities issues and ensure that its policy is implemented throughout all of its activities, contracts and service agreements.
We seek to ensure that people do not receive unfair treatment or reduced opportunities because of their age, sex, ethnicity, nationality, colour, religion, sexual orientation, disablement or poor health, social or personal background, employment status or living conditions or any other circumstances beyond their control.

It is our policy to ensure equal opportunity in recruitment, promotion, selection and development of staff and volunteers. We will ensure that:
•    All employees responsible for the recruitment and management of staff and volunteers receive awareness and training about equal opportunities;
•    All employees and volunteers are aware of this policy;
•    All employees and volunteers follow this policy;
•    The effectiveness of the policy is monitored and positive action taken to correct any causes of inequality.

 

Complaints Procedure for Volunteers


If you ever encounter a problem at HOT RADIO then we have a procedure in place to try and help resolve any formal complaints.

At first, you should raise any complaint you may have with the volunteer coordinator. You can do this verbally or in writing. If you are not satisfied with the response and action, your next course of action should be to contact the station manager.

The final escalation of the complaint process is to send a written letter to the board. This will be discussed and dealt within 2 months. Any decision made by the board cannot be overruled and is final.

 

Grievance Procedure


The HOT RADIO Grievance Policy applies to paid staff, volunteers or trainees of the organisation.

1. Introduction

HOT RADIO aims to create a work environment where volunteers feel valued. We also recognise that there may be occasions when volunteers have concerns or grievances and this grievance procedure enables individual volunteers to raise grievances more formally. The procedure provides an open and fair way for volunteers to make known their problems and aims to enable grievances to be resolved quickly before they fester and become major problems.

2. Informal Discussions

In the first instance, if any volunteer has a grievance about their volunteering or a colleague they should discuss it informally, as soon as possible, with the Station Manager or the Volunteer Coordinator. Your grievance will be taken seriously and they will ensure that everything is done to try and resolve the issue informally. It is hoped that the majority of concerns will be resolved at this stage. 

3. Formal Procedure

Stage 1

If a volunteer feels that the matter has not been resolved through informal discussions, they should put the complaint in writing to their line manager. If the complaint involves the staff member’s line manager the complaint should be put in writing to another manager in the organisation or to the board of directors.

A meeting will be held between the volunteer and their line manager (or other appropriate person) to respond to the complaints raised. The meeting will be an opportunity for the volunteer to explain their complaints and share how they would like them to be addressed. The volunteer has a right to be accompanied to the meeting.

Following the meeting, the line manager (or other appropriate person) will give a written response within 5 working days of the meeting outlining how the complaint(s) will be responded to. If the complaint is against another member of staff or volunteer or requires further investigation, the line manager (or other appropriate person) will need to carry out further meetings or investigations. In this case, the 5 working days limit above, may need to be extended. The response will follow this meeting and include a reference to the right of appeal.

Stage 2

If the volunteer feels the issue has still not been resolved satisfactorily, the volunteer must raise the matter, in writing, with the board. The board will invite the volunteer to a meeting

where they can discuss the matter and establish how best to resolve the situation. The volunteer has a right to be accompanied to the meeting.

Following the meeting, the board will give a written response within 5 working days of the meeting outlining how the complaint will be responded to.

If the complaint is against another member of staff or volunteer, or requires further investigation, the board will need to carry out further meetings or investigations. In this case, the 5 working days limit above, may need to be extended. The response will follow this meeting and include a reference to the right of appeal. 

4. Right of Appeal

If the volunteer wishes to appeal against any grievance decision, they must appeal, in writing within five working days of the decision being communicated to them to the board. The board will convene an Appeals Subcommittee to hear the appeal and the staff member will be invited to a meeting with the Appeals Subcommittee. The volunteer will have the right to be accompanied to the appeal meeting.

The Appeals sub committee’s decision will be final.

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